Frequently Asked Questions


When can I enter the Awards?

Entries for 2017 are currently closed and will open again in 2018. 

Do we enter the Compact or the Awards?

The decision on whether you apply for a Compact or enter the Awards will depend on where you are at with your Equal Pay journey. 

The  Equal Pay Best Practice Compact is a comparatively simple application process where you answer five open questions related to best practice and attach related documentation – usually documents you already use in your organisation will suffice.  If successful, you will be able to use the Compact logo on marketing and HR material as recognition of your commitment to Equal Pay.  Certificates are awarded at our annual Equal Pay Awards ceremony in November. 

The YWCA Equal Pay Awards is a more extensive questionnaire to help us identify and acknowledge emergent leaders through to champions in Equal Pay.  There are specific questions five categories to answer that require supporting documentation.  This entry process is more thorough and therefore may require a more significant amount of time depending on how organised or resourced your organisation is with Equal Pay documentation.  Each entry is thoroughly assessed by a team of qualified Equal Pay experts which results in a report to each entrant to assist them on their equal pay journey.  Award winners are announced at our annual Equal Pay Awards ceremony in November, with categories for small business, emerging, distinguished and companions.

We want to enter the Equal Pay Awards but don't know where to start.

The starting point is collating and analysing data with a gender lense:

  1. Gender
  2. Base pay rates
  3. Start dates (and time in role)
  4. Start rates (full-time and part-time)
  5. Current position in range
  6. Band allocation
  7. Job evaluation points (if used)
  8. Performance ratings
  9. Salary increases
  10. Variable pay (target and actual payouts)
  11. Length of service
  12. Career breaks and impact on remuneration
  13. Number and rate of promotions
  14. Age
  15. Ethnicity

What is the current Pay Equity situation in NZ?

  • Women are paid less than men in every country in the world. The World Economic Forum’s 2016 Global Gender Gap Report found that, at the present rate of progress, it would take 170 years to achieve global gender equality.
  • New Zealand in 2016 ranked tenth out of 145 countries in the report for its overall gender gap across education, health, economic opportunity and politics.
  • The gender pay gap in New Zealand in 2016 was 12.0 per cent, based on median hourly earnings and 13.6 % based on average hourly earnings.
  • Women on average are paid $600,000 less than men over their lifetimes.
  • The gender pay gaps are much larger for Māori, Pasifika and immigrant women, and women with disabilities.
  • New Zealand’s gender pay gap has persisted for decades, hovering around 10 per cent but never significantly reducing.
  • The gender pay gap exists irrespective of qualifications, skills or experience, with the “unexplained” part of the gap now estimated to comprise up to 83 per cent of the gap between male and female pay.
  • The Government on 17 April 2017 announced an historic settlement of Kristine Bartlett and other caregivers’ pay equity claims. The settlement covers 55,000 workers and the Government will spend more than $2 billion on it over five years.
  • In May, midwives announced that they had settled their claims for pay equity and better working conditions following mediation with the Ministry of Health.
  • A raft of other pay equity claims is now underway, including claims by school support workers, social workers and South Island District Health Board administrative and clerical staff.


What is the difference between Equal Pay & Pay Equity

It is important people understand the different components around equal pay and pay equity. Equal pay is about men getting paid more than women for doing exactly the same job. Apples and apples.

Pay equity tackles the issue from a different perspective, challenging the issue around women in female dominated industries getting paid less than work of similar value in male dominated industries. Women tend to be clustered in a relatively narrow range of occupations that have been traditionally considered women’s work and not always valued the same as men’s (like clerical, caring, cleaning). This is particularly the case for New Zealand which has relatively high levels of concentration of women workers in female dominated occupations, with 47% of women in occupations where 80% or more of employees are women. Apples and pears.

What are the Terms and Conditions?

Terms and Conditions 2017